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20121027
20121104
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a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy of free will and human control on the criminal side versus the civil side and not surprisingly on both sides "the state wins" because on the criminal side you go to prison and on the civil side, you get incarcerated civilly. >> i don't think that's much of a disconnect. i think -- so i agree with you the test has changed. that's not what i'm talking about. if you look at the kind
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
>>> my name is mary numyer. i live in washington but met chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very po
on together but he proactively came for this bill, s.b. 1506, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that f
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
organization and san francisco law enforcement, i will create an atmosphere of trust and cooperation in the district that will lower street crime and gang violence and above all i will help san francisco to be a leader. we will build bike lanes that will connect the city and reconnect the parks and find new ways to power our city in a way that is better for the planet and for our own wallets. i am not alone in having the vision for the future of san francisco that i do, i'm extremely proud of the people and organizations that have endorsed my candidacy because they share the hopes and the dreams, and the passion of the people that i have always depended on. they are far apart from one another on individual issues but they share my belief that working together we can achieve anything. my supporters include, california attorney general har ris, state senator yen, rashelle, norton, wynn, they gave me their sole number one endorsement and i am the only one endorsed by the police officer organization, the lgbt club and the firefighter unions and the chronicle who called me the candidate b
spending our sparse law enforcement resources wisely. the idea that if you bust drug crime, you will decrease property and violent crime has been scientifically disproven. we need to spend our scarce, law enforcement resources wisely, by having police patrol our streets on foot and be present in the neighborhood getting to know the residents. i will push hard for a true community policing model as supervisor and that is a promise. i believe one of the most important things a supervisor can do is listen to the people of the district and be responsive to them. i will be responsive to the people of the district not beholding to the downtown interest that seem to control our politics in this city. i will represent the people of district five not developers. i believe in the transformation all power of new ideas. i think that we need a city run hate street museum to be a tourist destination and the history of the area. my campaign is different. we are listening to voters we are not using political door hangers that end up as garbage on our streets and alienate voters. our campaign co
to themselves or someone else for 72 hours. we need to enact laura's law and mr. dufty is working on that and finding housing for these individuals but not to keep going back to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough love but because we do ca
and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but we need to do more. let's work with all stakeholders to assure that rules are based on fairn
boots on the ground and will at the political level to enforce the law and appears that we need state level support as well. >> thank you, so this is a big picture question. miss dillon. >> what do you think that the legislature can do to address the systemic problems with the finances. >> that is a big picture question, it is a tough question. i think that in the long term a lot of the problems that we have here in the budget relate to the ease at which citizens can put ballot box budgeting measure into his our state rule books and they don't sunset and the legislature has increasing little control as well as the government what can and cannot be cut every year. this is a problem that is not caused by democrats or republicans or the structure of our system. that is one thing that i would try to change is have legislation passed that would allow any such provisions that are sponsored by citizens and maybe even provisions that are sponsored by legislatures such as a senator to sunset or be examined regularly by some type of a commission. as to whether they remain valid. that is the big
and i went to school at hastings college of law. there i served as vice president of one of the largest law schools, largest public law schools in the country. i took that sense of purpose, and i applied to the san francisco courts indegint panel and there i work on behalf excuse the expression, dirt poor residents who cannot afford an attorney of their own. but i did not stop there. i took that sense of purpose, and i founded the radio and television program that originate, on ksfs called folk law to give voice to the issues facing san francisco now these are not the issues that make the 10:00 o'clock news, these are the issues like parking, these are the issues like domestic violence prevention and funding for the arts that are dear to my heart and are dear to the hearts of residents as well. folks, this election, is about the future. but i do know one thing here in the present, i know that working with my neighbors, my community members, whether you are a laborer or someone in the tech field or an artist, i know that one thing, we can overcome any of the challenges that we face if we
and costly individuals. but we also need law enforcement to tell people that they can't rome around town or come in from outside the city to block sidewalks and beg for change. this is a tough topic to tackle without sounding like some uncompassionate right wing jerk, but the situation is getting worse and we need to do what is best for everyone, including residents, small business owners and visitors. let's raise all schools up to excellence. we won't have to send our kids across town because the school lottery didn't work out. city college: let's follow the state restructuring report and learn from the operational dysfunction that has plagued the college for years. this brings up proposition a. we should not be burdening homeowners and small businesses with another tax, but city college is too important to jeopardize so i will put aside my taxation reservations and vote yes on a. >>> public safety, using a number of methods let's encourage our police and firefighters to live here in the city. we will have another earthquake and we need them here, not up in pet lululemon a, not down in
francisco state police department enforce the laws that we do have you would alleviate a lot of the problems. enforce the jay walking rule. enforce the traffic light rules. enforce the laws that we already have in existence. 19th avenue is the most traveled block or street in the city, so enforce the laws that we have on the books. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. yee. >> i also have a similar personal attitude about pedestrian safety. maybe some of you remember six years ago in the niewmp newspaper for several days i got hit by a car crossing the street and crushed my neck and was in the hospital and almost died so this issue is near and dear to me, so the 19th avenue is a unique situation. unfortunately it's controlled by caltrans i think, but here are three things we suggest that we do if we had control over it. number one, increase the yellow light to one or two seconds that would help a lot and versus when they cross the street and running the red light. number two, this might not be as popular but i would fight like crazy to get the over pass pedestrians to go over than rather than
and respectable law enforcement officials in this country who was considered an untouchable. he is respected by both major political parties. organized crime runs our local government. it is apparent by the fact that six supervisors violated state laws to pass a sweetheart deal for the park merced developer. when they were called out for breaking the law, they collaborated to break the law that granted citizens and residents oversight to their activities. the retaliation they deliberately vote today remove the sunshine ordinance task force only physically disabled member. even though they offered to stay on the task force until they successor could be found. the sunshine ordinance task force has a mandate that one member must be physically disabled at all times. they deliberately voted to remove the only physically disabled member of the task force, and the removal of this person was the dismantling of the sunshine task force. as a result, the sunshine task force could not perform their duties. it has been five months since the sunshine ordinance task force has met. when the six supervisors
. i believe in the natural law from john stewart mill and other philosophers that our rights do not flow from the government, the government's rights and the government's rights flow from the citizens. and so the government should have as limited a scope as possible, not and interfere with business and not interfere with our privacy and not spy on us and generally keep the public order and that is about it. >> thank you, so following up on that one of those things that the government is involved in right now is the educational system. and california used to have an education system that was the envy of the nation. how do you feel we get that back? >> well, it is a tragedy that what used to be one of the top systems in the country is now i think, 47th according to a recent standard that i saw. the senator and folks in his party in sacramento believe that spending more is the answer. that is clearly not the case. i think that los angeles county they spent $9,000 per student in public school system. the average cost of private school $6,000. i support the voucher system that allow
to the domestic workers i am an attorney who helps workers, and enforce their rights on the federal and state law and i think that it is important that those rights be respected. he posed the question to the authors of that law in vetoing it as to what is the impact going to be on some of the elderly and the sick who rely on home care workers in particular, and i guess the governor, a democrat found that legislation to be too broad, too enerous and em posing more requirements on the small businesses than was necessary and asked that a more tailored and more appropriate set of legislation come back to him on that subject and i would agree with that. >> mr. leno. >> i supported both of those bills with regard to the domestic workers' rights bill. we heard so many horror stories in the committee hearings. if you could imagine being in the employment and not being able to take the kinds of breaks for meals and for rest, even to have an 8-hour workday, it is a different kind of employment, so it is not as easily tailored to the kind of worker protection rights that we expect in every other industry. s
, and if it is illegal then we need to do outreach so that people need to know it again and if they are violating the law well then i am for enforcing the law. >> thank you ma'am. mr. lagos. >> short term rentals is something i know about having lived in mark merced because our landlord rents out them on a nightly or weekly basis and i am oppose to that. i am opposed at the whole idea of renting out short term rentals to people, so i would be opposed to taxation on those units because i am opposed to the whole idea of short term rentals because they deprive people from affordable housing and it's an end around rent control. >> mr. rogers. >> i think that's a good point. i have a frent who has a rental unit down stairs and has an agency that is providing her people that would stay there and they were people that were travelers and they would stay for a month and then she would look for another tenant there and it would be another two months before she got a tenant and stay a month or two weeks so it went, so she wasn't making a lot of money. the idea that it should be rented out as a steady income to p
of assurances to rate payers that as we spend your money, we will do it consistent with law and also as wisely as we possibly can. also wanted to make sure this wasn't just a bunch of words. we wanted it to be structured in such a way that somebody could audit it and could go in and take a look at our performance and say, you set out to be good guys, how have you performed against that? as we stand before our rate payers to be able to say, we have committed to managing your money well, we have been audited by the controller against our objectives, and we have an answer on that. hopefully that answer will be that we have met and exceeded all of those objectives. so, i think it's very important. and i think over the course of the last year, the various drafts of this policy have improved significantly, and i think it's been worth that time. i also wanted to note the comments that we received from cac and -- especially chc had a bunch of recommendationses that deal with rate setting. that is not the particular purpose of this policy. we do have a rates policy. i think they raise some great questi
about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solutions. that involves a discourse with policy makers. as people of color, we need to be accountable and
a campaign to address this at the state level in 2010. we got a law passed in california that is continuing to go to new states. we are excited about that. we're launching more cities. you will see this in more areas. the neat part about what happens with get around is it is building a community. people know who they live next to each other and can help each other out. that is a common theme we have heard. we're also helping the environment because it takes cars off the road. less people have to own cars. never having owned a car, i think that is a good thing. it helps me live a healthier lifestyle. i am excited to be on the panel. >> thanks, jessica. i was putting together a presentation recently with the logos of companies in the sharing economy on the map near our office at eco dash working place --at a coworking place. i counted 20 share economy places in my neighborhood. there are new companies launched every week. this is just a small sample, some the leaders in san francisco. jay, give us some background on the sharing economy working group and how you think it benefits san francisco
be to make compliance with existing laws and regulations more clear and more easy for local residents. london, for example, is doing a great job of this in anticipation of the olympics. they have run out of hotel rooms, and they realize that the whole purpose of the olympics was to create economic development in some of the most underserved areas of the city, and they are not getting that. we will be working collaborative lee to come up with a solution to solve that problem. they have created a wonderful website that clearly states what you need to do to be compliant. >> that is what christopher is doing in london then, right? >> yes. >> one more question for jay, and i think we should open up for questions from everyone here. tell us what existing city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think
've achieved parity and equity in law, or at least we've achieved the law-workin' on the implementation. now it's time to achieve a quality in service. since day one, this administration has been focused on applying sound, research-based drug policies geared toward protecting americans from the threats that drugs pose to public health and safety. i spent my entire career in law enforcement. i know we can't arrest our way out of our drug problem, and that's why our policies are based on the recognition that drug addiction is a disease, that it can be successfully prevented, and it can be treated. and simply put, the tragic wreckage wrought by drug use can be prevented before it becomes a criminal justice or a public health emergency. i stand here today as a living example that a better life is possible. i realize that in grace and wellness could lead me to improved mental health and physical health. as recently as 4 years ago, after having struggled with clinical depression for my entire adult life, i was on the verge of giving up. the disgrace, shame, and stigma of my mental health problems had
of the rps law, we don't have to procure beyond those resources except very infrequently. and we are proposing that that procurement be from renewable energy credits. >> so, the way they're titled would be appropriate? >> they would be. they would be qualified resources under state law. >> if we had -- >> if we had them, yes. >> and we have no geo thermal here? >> correct. we have purchased it in the part, but we do not have any in our portfolio today. >> where do we purchase it from? >> we purchase from the geo thermal system in guyser. >> in guyser ville? >> yes. >> are they acceptible our hydro now? >> yes, commissioner, they are accepting our hydro. yeah, another hooray, that's three in one meeting. [laughter] >> we have -- we were able through the legislative process to explain that were we to have the same rules applied to us, we would just be selling our hydro and substituting in other renewable resources. the objective of the law is to in part to reduce the emissions from power plants. we don't have any power plants that emit. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah, i have a couple of q
't disclose to me they wanted to demolish my apartment and which is a violation of the law and with sunshine i began to research and research and now i have 43 pounds of paper in the research and because my case, sunshine case, that found supervisors wiener, colen, chiu and mar and they broke the state law and that is why this case is in court. they shut down sunshine and the retaliation was so strong i was evicted from my home and because i was raised right i would do it over again, and once i am elected one of the law enforcement officials will swear me in. >> i am mr. garcia and have the diseepest experience of anyone. i have many years and seven years as an educators and taught there and president of board of ethics and board of appeals and 25 years of experience in doing service to the neighborhood. i am supported by the incumbent and scott wiener and others and i want very bad to be your supervisor and i am asking for your support and there's give me your vote on november 6. thank you. >> hi. i am joel io and i am running for supervisor and they have a way of looking at the happy m
to alameda, california. including fishery, law enforcement, drug interactions. sherman and her sister were the only regular u.s. armed forces. >> in may of 1986, sherman was delivered to the shipiard for renovatio renovatio shipyard for renovations. [inaudible] >> after completing the trial period of this project, sheave recommissioned as part of new generation fully operational marine vessels as the coast guard celebrated 200 years of service. in july 2001. sherman assisted with the u.s. sanctions in the persian gulf and supported good will in south africa and madagascar and received a medal for the interdiction of a panamanian vessel carrying 20 tons of corn where a street value of $600 million. in may of 2011. sherman was transferred to her current home in san diego, california. the coast guard executing national and international missions maintain the positive reputation worldwide, performing a multitude of positions. she is an excellent example of a cutter with proven capabilities in all coast guard facilities. she continues to patrol in the south pacific. she performs a combined flee
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 132 (some duplicates have been removed)